Tagged: HTTP

0

What is the Web of Things?

Note: this article was first published in the IoT Technica Curiosa magazine. The Internet of Things – IoT for short – is here to stay and to change our world for the better. This grand vision depicts a world where people, buildings, and physical objects are connected to a single and common network. Bottles of soda, lighting systems, cars and everything in between can provide services and exchange data with each other. You might have noticed that the Internet of Things feels very much like an Intranet of Things: to interact with 10 different devices from your phone, you have...

5

What’s in HTTP/2 for the Internet of Things? 1/2

If you followed this blog you probably know that the motto of the Web of Things community is to re-use Web protocols to build a truly interoperable Application Layer for the Internet of Things. One of the key protocols we are talking about is HTTP currently massively deployed on the Web in its 1.1 version. HTTP/1.1 is a great protocol when used correctly to build Web Services as illustrated in this book! However, it dates back from 1999. Remember this time? Back then we were using Windows 95, wired phones to call each other and the IoT term had just...

0

Getting Started with the Internet of Things Book

Our friends from Oberon microsystems (who designed yaler), just released a tech book (just like we love) about they experience with hacking around the Internet of Things. The book called “Getting Started with the Internet of Things” which is publish by our favorite nerditors O’Reilly Media is available in PDF and paper, and is written by Cuno Pfister.

Hello I’m WebKit, a Browser: Serve Me… XML Please! 0

Hello I’m WebKit, a Browser: Serve Me… XML Please!

Warning: this is an extremely technical post! But since this bug drove me nuts for a little while, I do have to expose it to the WoT community 😉 Finalizing the open-sourcing of our framework for making RFID tags part of the Web (more about that here!), I was testing it the whole day on various browsers. Firefox, fine! Opera, fine! IE, fine! Chrome, what the heck is that page!? As you might know, a resource in REST is not bound to a format (or representation as they call it). Rather, a well-done RESTful API should be able to serve...

Welcoming the Sun SPOTs to the Web of Things 0

Welcoming the Sun SPOTs to the Web of Things

It’s a known fact that we (or at least) love Sun SPOTs. Not the ones on the sun but the Sensor nodes developed by Sun Labs (now/soon Oracle Labs?) a couple of years ago. Speaking Java better than any language out there (including French ;-)), when the first fully-natively-java Wireless Sensor Nodes came out you can imagine my joy. Since then I can’t remember a paper we wrote that does not use Spots in its prototype! We worked quite a lot with them, created several stacks to make them “Web-enabled” and RESTful, to make them part of the Web of...

CouchDB 1.0 released 3

CouchDB 1.0 released

As in our project we needed a (quickly setup, reliable, and flexible) backend system to store sensor data, I played around with CouchDB as I wanted to explore a RESTful data store. As a matter of fact, the version 1.0 was released just a few minutes before I installed it. First impression, wow. Sleek, pretty fast, damn easy to use, flexible as any software should be (not the conventional click and run install, but damn well documented installation). I have to admit I’m impressed by the quality of this release, just as much as by the documentation. I think this...

COAP-01 draft out! 0

COAP-01 draft out!

After the last draft released in december, the COAP folks just released a few days ago a more refined version of the COAP draft, with additional thoughts on coap-http mapping, RESTful verbs for constrained environments, and pub/sub notifications, and more. Abstract This document specifies the Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP), a specialized RESTful transfer protocol for use with constrained networks and nodes for machine-to-machine applications such as smart energy and building automation. These constrained nodes often have 8-bit microcontrollers with small amounts of ROM and RAM, while networks such as 6LoWPAN often have high packet error rates and a typical throughput...

Fast Prototyping WoT Apps with NIWEA 1

Fast Prototyping WoT Apps with NIWEA

I gave a few thoughts recently about what the iPad (& iPhone) represent for the WoT. NIWEA As our friend Hannes Gassert awesomely summarized it recently, NIWEA (Native Interoperable Web Applications) is the sweetest method to build interactive applications for all things mobile, plus NIWEA feels like it was made for the Web of Things. In a nutshell, NIWEA are simple Web applications (developed only with HMTL/CSS/Javascript) designed to look & feel like a “real” (native) mobile application. This not only provides a great environment to develop easily apps for the iPhone/Pad, Android, Blackberry & co, but in particular it...

Yaler 1.0 released 2

Yaler 1.0 released

We’re happy to announce that our friends at Oberon Microsystems have released the first open version of yaler (reverse of relay). The have made an excellent impression at our WoT2010 workshop by showing a demo of an essential building block for building an infrastructure for the Web of Things. In two words it’s a server to which embedded devices can initiate an HTTP connection, which will be kept open. Using the reversehttp protocol, notifications can be send anytime from the server to any device connected to yaler, even when behind a firewall or NAT. From to the official website: A...