Tagged: Websockets

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What is the Web of Things?

Note: this article was first published in the IoT Technica Curiosa magazine. The Internet of Things – IoT for short – is here to stay and to change our world for the better. This grand vision depicts a world where people, buildings, and physical objects are connected to a single and common network. Bottles of soda, lighting systems, cars and everything in between can provide services and exchange data with each other. You might have noticed that the Internet of Things feels very much like an Intranet of Things: to interact with 10 different devices from your phone, you have...

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What’s in HTTP/2 for the Internet of Things? 1/2

If you followed this blog you probably know that the motto of the Web of Things community is to re-use Web protocols to build a truly interoperable Application Layer for the Internet of Things. One of the key protocols we are talking about is HTTP currently massively deployed on the Web in its 1.1 version. HTTP/1.1 is a great protocol when used correctly to build Web Services as illustrated in this book! However, it dates back from 1999. Remember this time? Back then we were using Windows 95, wired phones to call each other and the IoT term had just...

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Oh HTML5 WebSockets, Push Data to my Mobile!

At last a slightly geeky post 😉 ! A few days ago I was at Google Zurich (GTUG) to present a more technical remix of a talk I originally gave at Jazoon 2011. In a nutshell, the talk was about how HTML5 WebSockets would soon be ready for pushing data to mobile phones in a standard way (and possibly soon to/from any embedded device?). In a Web of Things context, we used this at the MIT Auto-ID labs to push data “directly” from RFID readers to Android or iOS mobile phones within a few lines of Javascript code (for the...

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EPC Cloud: Simplifying the Internet of Things Thanks to Web Patterns: HTML 5 Websockets (Part 2/3)

Part 1: Cloud & REST | Part 2: HTML5 WebSockets | Part 3: Physical Mashups In a recent post, we were explaining how in a project common to MIT and ETH Zurich, we simplified deployments of IoT applications based on the EPC Global standards. We operated this simplification by applying four of the Web of Things patterns: Cloud Computing, RESTful Interface, Real-Time Web and Physical Mashups. In the first related post we described how we used Cloud Computing and RESTful Interfaces. It is now time to talk a little bit more about one of the other pattern: the Real-Time Web.