Tagged: webserver

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ARM to lead the IoT?

It’s very exciting for us to see all the noise (& reposts) or the ARM Cortex-M0+ processor (aka. the “flycatcher”) that was unveiled yesterday. Branded as the world’s most energy-efficient microprocessor it is optimized to deliver high performance (with a 32 bits architecture!) for a very low power consumption, which makes it the ideal chip for intelligent sensors and smart control systems in a broad range of applications. In other words, the ideal chip to power the Web of Things.

Welcoming the Sun SPOTs to the Web of Things 0

Welcoming the Sun SPOTs to the Web of Things

It’s a known fact that we (or at least) love Sun SPOTs. Not the ones on the sun but the Sensor nodes developed by Sun Labs (now/soon Oracle Labs?) a couple of years ago. Speaking Java better than any language out there (including French ;-)), when the first fully-natively-java Wireless Sensor Nodes came out you can imagine my joy. Since then I can’t remember a paper we wrote that does not use Spots in its prototype! We worked quite a lot with them, created several stacks to make them “Web-enabled” and RESTful, to make them part of the Web of...

OpenPicus Community & FlyPort 5

OpenPicus Community & FlyPort

The OpenPicus community released a wi-fi module called FlyPort. It is a small device that uses the Microchip PIC24F (256K Flash+16K Ram, 16Mips@32Mhz) and MRF24WB0MA/RM WI-FI certified module. FlyPort runs a wireless Stack (TCP/IP version 5.25 from Microchip) and has a 26 Pin connector for easy prototyping. Applications and libraries are open source and can be freely downloaded from the openpicus website. Programmers have full control of the wi-fi module, thus the Flyport can act as tiny Web server and client that can directly interact with other Web resources directly, without requiring a gateway. Besides, this project has a social...

CouchDB 1.0 released 3

CouchDB 1.0 released

As in our project we needed a (quickly setup, reliable, and flexible) backend system to store sensor data, I played around with CouchDB as I wanted to explore a RESTful data store. As a matter of fact, the version 1.0 was released just a few minutes before I installed it. First impression, wow. Sleek, pretty fast, damn easy to use, flexible as any software should be (not the conventional click and run install, but damn well documented installation). I have to admit I’m impressed by the quality of this release, just as much as by the documentation. I think this...

Yaler 1.0 released 2

Yaler 1.0 released

We’re happy to announce that our friends at Oberon Microsystems have released the first open version of yaler (reverse of relay). The have made an excellent impression at our WoT2010 workshop by showing a demo of an essential building block for building an infrastructure for the Web of Things. In two words it’s a server to which embedded devices can initiate an HTTP connection, which will be kept open. Using the reversehttp protocol, notifications can be send anytime from the server to any device connected to yaler, even when behind a firewall or NAT. From to the official website: A...

Java card 3 released 4

Java card 3 released

SUN is about to release the newer java card 3! Quoting the wikipedia article: Java Card refers to a technology that allows small Java-based applications (applets) to be run securely on smart cards and similar small memory footprint devices. Java Card is the tiniest of Java targeted for embedded devices. Java Card gives the user ability to program the device and make them application specific. It is widely used in SIM cards (used in GSM mobile phones) and ATM cards. The first Java Card was introduced in 1996 by Schlumberger‘s card division which later merged with Gemplus to form Gemalto....

Giving some REST to your C++ code: embedding the SHTTPD server. 1

Giving some REST to your C++ code: embedding the SHTTPD server.

Wanting to turn the Ploggs, into more RESTful devices, I needed to add a web server (HTTP) to the C++ code managing the Ploggs. After comparing and trying a number of lightweight web servers (Apache was not an option for this kind of small app) I picked SHTTPD, mainly because: It was one of the few I managed to embed in my C++ code (I’m not a C expert…) It offered the possibility of registering call back methods when a particular URL is called, which makes it a quite good candidate for a REST interface. Here is how I did...