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For the term "REST".
5

First WoT W3C Interest Group Face to Face Meeting

Note: although this is a summary of the ideas and discussions I was involved in at the WoT W3C IG meeting these are my views and they may not necessarily reflect the views of the W3C WoT IG.   A couple of weeks ago we had the chance to participate to the first face to face meeting of the W3C WoT (Web of Things) Interest Group (IG). We were reporting a little while back about the foundation of this group which was officially kicked off recently with a first face 2 face meeting that took place in Munich. This group is...

2

WS-* vs REST for the Internet of Things

It is no secret that current trends inspired from the development of the Web 2.0 advocate designing smart things (e.g., wireless sensors nodes or home appliances) as service platforms. Interoperable services are mainly achieved using two different (families of) approaches: WS-* and RESTful Web services. It is also no secret that we, at Webofthings.org are big fans of REST. Hence, one critic that we often get is that our preference for REST is not really founded on data but rather on a guts feeling which basically was … true! Hence, as part of my Ph.D. Thesis I wanted to discuss...

2

EPC Cloud: Simplifying the Internet of Things Thanks to Web Patterns: Cloud Computing & REST (Part 1/3)

Part 1: Cloud & REST | Part 2: HTML5 WebSockets | Part 3: Physical Mashups Since last summer, I had the chance to work at the MIT Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity (LMP) in the Auto-ID Labs sub-group, working with the lab associate director Christian Floerkemeier and Prof. Sanjay Sarma. Six month after the beginning of the project we reached a fist milestone and thought it would be good to wrap up what we did there. The idea of the project is to study how Web and Web of Things blueprints (i.e., architectural patterns) can help to foster the adoption...

RFID for the REST of us! 0

RFID for the REST of us!

In our second talk at IoT 2010 we presented a project we kept warm (and working on) for a little while now: bringing RFID to the Web. Not RFID in the sense of small RFID readers like the nice phidget reader meant for prototyping, but the world of standardized RFID networks and in particular the EPC (Electronic Product Code) Network and its EPCIS (Information Service). The Electronic Product Code Information Service (EPCIS) is a standard which defines interfaces enabling RFID events to be captured and queried. The query interface, implemented with WS-* Web services, enables business applications to consume and...

REST-*, oh my … They Dared! 4

REST-*, oh my … They Dared!

In an attempt to “standardize” REST a little more, Red Hat is launching an open alliance and community towards creating standards for RESTful Web Services (hem aren’t RESTful Web Services already implemented using some standards like… HTTP :-)) Of course this is of interest to our Web of Things community since we definitely foster the use of REST towards a architecture to integrate things to the Web (see paper and that whitepaper for instance). However it seems like the REST-* initiative is also generating a lot of unhappy people amongst the RESTians. One of the reason is that they fear...

Remash! – Blueprints for RESTful Situational Web Applications 1

Remash! – Blueprints for RESTful Situational Web Applications

Remash! By Benjamin Blau, Steffen Lamparter and Steffen Haak, Steffen Haak is providing us with some blueprints for RESTful apps. He starts with a number of principles: 1) Resource oriented architectures -> services should expose data instead of functionality 2) Lightweight composition and flexible binding -> services should be re-composables 3) Mass collaboration, customization and perpetual beta -> ability to share the compositions. Steffen then explains how these principles were applied against a number of tools (e.g. Yahoo Pipes, etc.) to evaluate them. They identified three types of shortcomings: 1) Integration -> rather hard to integrate third-party services, not already...

A RESTful API for CERN’s LHC 3

A RESTful API for CERN’s LHC

The news came out this morning, the LHC of CERN is going to provide a RESTful API for anyone to be able to address the particles from the Web. As an example, interested users can check the speed of any proton using URIs like: http://cern.ch/LHC/hadrons/protons/1999998212321321321312372132137124081234312412341234/speed April Bauer, head of communication at CERN said: “We expect people to quickly build mashups on top of this API”. When we asked for concrete examples she mentionned: “for instance a mashup with Google Map could show, in real-time of course, the position of any proton in the beam”. For the records, a full speed...

Using REST on SunSPOTs 3

Using REST on SunSPOTs

This post is the second in this series where we try to describe some of the concrete projects we are working on right now. The ultimate goal of the project was to create a smart logger that could be attached to shipments in order to monitor them while being transported or through their life-cycle, sort of a “ueber-RFID”. Of course, we wanted to use the REST principles in order to fully integrate the smart logger to the Web as well as to be able easily build applications on top of the logger. As smart loggers, we use the Sun SPOT...

On REST for devices 9

On REST for devices

One things that I don’t understand, is that most people in our field do not really like our approach, or maybe they simply don’t get it. Indeed, we’re kind of stuck between several worlds: wireless sensor networks (WSN) people that find our approach too esoteric, and HCI people that find it not enough sexy. It is a bit annoying, as people don’t take us very seriously, especially not WSN researcher. I overheard comments like “What? You want to use the Web to connect devices? hahaha! I can’t stop laughing, haha it hurts me! Come on, be serious dude! Using the...

David E. Culler, UC Berkley on RESTful Sensor Networks 0

David E. Culler, UC Berkley on RESTful Sensor Networks

Today, Vlad and I had the chance of taking part to a talk from David E. Culler from UC Berkley, one of the main TinyOS contributors. While Vlad is going to summarize the talk a bit later here, I’d like to talk a bit more about the end of the talk. One one of his slides he had a figure of what he would like to see implemented on WSNs at the node level. Besides a comprehensive IPV6lowpan (aka 6lowpan) stack he mentioned an implementation of HTTP and, moreover, a web server! The next slide was about sense making and...