Tagged: REST

Web of Things Core Concepts Paper 3

Web of Things Core Concepts Paper

Together with Vlad and Erik Wilde, we’ve been trying since a while to write a scientific paper out of our common technical report that would sum up the founding concepts of the Web of Things. The paper finally got accepted for IoT 2010. This is a good sign because it emphasizes the fact that the Internet of Things community is now really looking into Web standards as a candidate common integration bus for the application layer of the physical world. A fact that did not really hold two years ago, when Erik’s attempt to publish a WoT paper at IoT...

Hello I’m WebKit, a Browser: Serve Me… XML Please! 0

Hello I’m WebKit, a Browser: Serve Me… XML Please!

Warning: this is an extremely technical post! But since this bug drove me nuts for a little while, I do have to expose it to the WoT community 😉 Finalizing the open-sourcing of our framework for making RFID tags part of the Web (more about that here!), I was testing it the whole day on various browsers. Firefox, fine! Opera, fine! IE, fine! Chrome, what the heck is that page!? As you might know, a resource in REST is not bound to a format (or representation as they call it). Rather, a well-done RESTful API should be able to serve...

Mashing Up our Web-Enabled Homes 3

Mashing Up our Web-Enabled Homes

Imagine every home appliance being 1) IPv6 enabled 2) RESTful, imagine the tools you could create on top of such an eco-system! In particular, imagine the idea of “physical mashups” becoming a reality in our homes sweet homes: creating simple, ad-hoc applications on top of your appliances as easily as you can create Web 2.0 (virtual) mashups nowadays. The dream of every hacker and tech-saavy? Well at least one of our dreams (and part of my Ph.D. by the way ;-))! Well a dream that we have been trying to demonstrate and implement lately. The outcome is two papers. In...

Touch the Web 2010 @ ICWE 2010 2

Touch the Web 2010 @ ICWE 2010

A few days ago I had the chance to participate to the “touch the Web 2010” workshop. The goals of the workshop were rather similar to the ones of WoT 2010 however, rather than being hosted at a Ubicomp/Pervasive venue, Touch the Web was collocated with ICWE2010, a pure Web engineering conference. The most surprising fact was probably how close the two communities are getting. Web people are increasingly interested in embedded/physical/sensor computing, and on the other hand, pervasive people are getting more and more convinced that the Web protocols as not so bad after all (take this paper for...

CouchDB 1.0 released 3

CouchDB 1.0 released

As in our project we needed a (quickly setup, reliable, and flexible) backend system to store sensor data, I played around with CouchDB as I wanted to explore a RESTful data store. As a matter of fact, the version 1.0 was released just a few minutes before I installed it. First impression, wow. Sleek, pretty fast, damn easy to use, flexible as any software should be (not the conventional click and run install, but damn well documented installation). I have to admit I’m impressed by the quality of this release, just as much as by the documentation. I think this...

COAP-01 draft out! 0

COAP-01 draft out!

After the last draft released in december, the COAP folks just released a few days ago a more refined version of the COAP draft, with additional thoughts on coap-http mapping, RESTful verbs for constrained environments, and pub/sub notifications, and more. Abstract This document specifies the Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP), a specialized RESTful transfer protocol for use with constrained networks and nodes for machine-to-machine applications such as smart energy and building automation. These constrained nodes often have 8-bit microcontrollers with small amounts of ROM and RAM, while networks such as 6LoWPAN often have high packet error rates and a typical throughput...

Fast Prototyping WoT Apps with NIWEA 1

Fast Prototyping WoT Apps with NIWEA

I gave a few thoughts recently about what the iPad (& iPhone) represent for the WoT. NIWEA As our friend Hannes Gassert awesomely summarized it recently, NIWEA (Native Interoperable Web Applications) is the sweetest method to build interactive applications for all things mobile, plus NIWEA feels like it was made for the Web of Things. In a nutshell, NIWEA are simple Web applications (developed only with HMTL/CSS/Javascript) designed to look & feel like a “real” (native) mobile application. This not only provides a great environment to develop easily apps for the iPhone/Pad, Android, Blackberry & co, but in particular it...

Java and the Web of Things 3

Java and the Web of Things

Coming back from Jazoon, a conference that some people see as the European version of Java One. Since this conference is for me a nice concentrate of what’s coming in the Java/OO/Business software world, I wanted to report a little on what I’ve seen there and what this implies/offers in a Web of Things context. Let’s be modular As last year, modularity was a BIG keyword. The Java community has acknowledged the success of OSGi and is looking for a somewhat closer integration of these concepts. The Language Support for Modular Programming (JSR 294) will be part of Java 7...

Yaler 1.0 released 2

Yaler 1.0 released

We’re happy to announce that our friends at Oberon Microsystems have released the first open version of yaler (reverse of relay). The have made an excellent impression at our WoT2010 workshop by showing a demo of an essential building block for building an infrastructure for the Web of Things. In two words it’s a server to which embedded devices can initiate an HTTP connection, which will be kept open. Using the reversehttp protocol, notifications can be send anytime from the server to any device connected to yaler, even when behind a firewall or NAT. From to the official website: A...

Internet developers day – part 2 0

Internet developers day – part 2

Here is part 2, part one is here. One Web, Yoan Blanc, doSimple. We thought of a single uniform web. Banana phone, with WAP. Now we have tons of devices that try to surf the Web and they all want the same level of experience (mobile browser market share version 1.0 image). Discusses the <meta viewport>, that allows it to fit on many mobile devices (he talks about ppk, peter paul koch who does testing of mobile browsers). Testing: MicroEmulator runs opera mini. You don’t need an iPhone app! Html is enough. You can also use manifest.cache to specify what...